Journey Across the Silk Road.. Part 3..

Day 3: Destination Xian to Tianshu

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img_20160622_162153Day 3 was for sure the day that I felt more like a foreigner than any other days during the whole trip. Tianshui City was once the first stop that the Silk Road made upon entering the Gansu Province. Situated in the southeastern region of Gansu, it lies halfway between Lanzhou and Xian, and along the upper branch of the Weihe River, where Shaanxi, Gansu and Sichuan provinces converge.

We went to the Fuxi Temple, now let me give you aimg_20160622_151150 little bit of history about the temple. Fu Xi Temple was originally built to commemorate Fu Xi, a legendary ruler of great antiquity. It is said that Fu Xi was born in Tianshui. Fu Xi Temple was built in 1490 of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and rebuilt in 1524 of Qing Dynasty (1616-1911). The temple has three rows of buildings, with the front gate facing south.

myxj_20160623071029_saveFrom south to north are the memorial archways, temples, the terrace, stele pavilion, the main hall and the ancient cypresses in the 3,700 mu (1 mu equals 0.0667 hectare) of the temple yard. The construction of the temple is of typical Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) style with symmetric structures, formed and precise layout, and marvelous carved beams and painted rafters.

The Hall of the Deceased King built on the open terrace in the central yard is the main building in Fu Xi Temple. With double eaves and corbel brackets (set of brackets between crossbeams and columns, each set consisting of tiers of outstretching arms called gong, cushioned with trapezoidal blocks called dou), colored glaze pantiles and the ornamental design of dragon mouth, the whole building looks very primitive but elegant.

img_20160622_162744The moment we arrived at the temple we were given a task to take the funniest picture we could take as a competition of the day. Whenever I go to a small town in China I always end up being the tourist attraction of the day, resulting in me taking countless picturesmmexport1467276339466 with Chinese people, so I decided that since I was already attracting so much attention from the locals in Tianshu, I wanted to see how much more attention I could generate just from standing there. So I found a high stoop in the Temple and just stood there to see if people will come forth to try and take pictures with me.

 

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Needless to say that the experiment went further than we expected, within a few minutes we had people lining up like a concert to take pictures. One after the other they posed withmmexport1467276550997 me, each one wanting a picture. The moment we decided we were done they kept following us throughout the temple wanting more pictures. It was controlled chaos for the next 2hours while we were in the temple grounds. The plan completely backfired on us and we ended up having to leave sooner than we wanted to because we caused way too much commotion.

I would say if you wanna see how friendly local Tianshu people are and how beautiful the temples and historical places are definitely book your ticket today..

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